NARA Collective
We are creators who protect creators. We amplify your message through a cohesive visual experience. We recognize art as a catalyst for change. And understand that our power is in the collective.
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NARATIVE

interviews to discover and connect with multidisciplinary artists

Vince Fraser = surrealism + animated photography

 

Three words that describe you?
Rough, smooth and chaotic (at times)

What’s your first artistic memory?
Good question actually. I’ve always drawn from a very young age. I would say my first [artistic] memory would be in primary school. I was fond of marvel comics, a big hulk fan growing up in the ‘70s. If I remember right I drew a comic strip, which I made into a poster. I was around age 9 or 10. Everyone in school was like, “WOW.” That was when I first really realized I had artistic skills.

What was your biggest influence (artistic or other) growing up?
I’m influenced from all types of things – fashion on the high street, furniture, interiors, architecture. When it comes to art, I like surrealist and trippy work. A lot of what I’m creating is coming from the subconscious so I don’t really realize its’ influence until it’s completed. In the ‘80s I was a big acid house fan, so there’s probably bits of that in my mind. When it comes to artists, a lot of early 19th century artists including Salvador Dali and Picasso as well as Rafal Olbnsk and Mati Klarwein. I was influenced in my early years by ‘70s and ‘80s reggae covers – Tony Mr. Dermott (the in-house designer for legendary dub label Greensleeves) was a big inspiration.

 Album Cover Designed by Tony Mr. Dermott

Album Cover Designed by Tony Mr. Dermott

Fashion I would probably say Alexander McQueen, Issey Miyake, Iris Van Herpen. From architecture, Philippe Starck, Zaha Hadid. Motion wise, I’ve starting to follow a guy on instagram called Sholim who is a polish surreal motion artist. It blew me away when I looked like at his work. I don’t know how he does it.

Sculpture no 8 by #Sholim

How did you learn your different mediums?
I came out of uni after studying interior design and worked for an American company called Gensler, an [integrated] architecture and design firm. I thought to myself, “this isn’t really what I want to do.” A lot of people in my department told me, “Vince, you should be doing graphics.” I never really took [the advice] seriously. One day I thought to myself, I’m going to pack in my job and do graphics.

I had a friend who was working for the Art Director of an editorial company and she told me they needed a front cover and asked if I could do it. It was my first introduction into illustration and magazine covers. That’s where I basically started from. Then from doing covers I started working for a bunch of publishing and advertising companies [as well as] film festivals. Recently I have been starting to work with motion. I started to get a bit bored with illustration and thought ok I need to start to do something else as well. I’ve always been interested in 3D animation. I started teaching myself photo animation and it went from there. That’s what I’ve been up to over the past year.

What’s the process for your animated photos?
A lot the images on my instagram are collaborations with photographers that I have hand picked. [I select them based on] if I like their work and they’re coming from a certain angle; the image is striking and I feel I can add to it. I [then] try to collaborate with them if they’re willing. I also do some shooting myself but I wouldn’t say that I am a professional photographer. I also use other illustrations and collages.

What’s the first step in your creative process?
Generally trying to gather a bunch of information about the subject I’m about to illustrate. I create mood board of screenshots and go from there.

What kind of music do you listen to when you create?
Lots of different music, I’m quite eclectic. I listen to anything from deep house, through to  neo soul, through to afro house, dub, jazz…. There’s a Belgian Dj and producer Boddhi Satva who has a record label called Ancestral Soul. I used to have a great CD from Afro Beat musician Tony Allen.

What causes are you passionate about?
Prostate cancer, the main reason for that is my dad passed away [from it] about 15 years ago. Since then I’ve done a few charity runs here in London. I think it needs to be highlighted because a lot of people are scared of going to the doctor and getting checked.

What are you working on right now? Any exciting projects?
I’m working on a poster for a chalk [art] festival in Florida. I’ll be creating the poster for the event and helping them with some of the marketing. They have chalk artists coming in from all over the world. I’m also working on a record cover, but I’m not allowed to say until it goes out. If all goes according to schedule it will be released in November and then I’ll be able to share more.   

What would you imagine your last words to be?
Oh my god. That’s a good question. I really don’t know, it’s something I never really thought about.

For more info, visit: www.vincefraser.com 

Ashley Edes